Tincup American Whiskey Launches in the UK

By / 3 years ago / Drinks, News / No Comments

32% rye mash bill and Deadwood styling nod to Colorado’s gold rush miners

Deadwood fans will like Tincup – its heavy, embossed bottle would look very much at home on Al Swearengen’s desk. This is entirely intentional of course, as the name Tincup refers to both the vessel that frontier miners would use to drink their whiskey, as well as the Colorado town of Tin Cup.

Tincup is the product of mashing and fermenting corn, rye and malt for 80 hours. It is distilled twice and cut to 125 proof before being aged in charred white oak barrels and stored in 6-storey high brick rick houses. The producers say:

Masterminded by its co-founder & distilling legend Jess Graber, Tincup is produced by mashing and fermenting corn, rye and malt for 80 hours; it is distilled twice and cut to 125 proof before being aged in charred white oak barrels and stored in 6-storey high brick rick houses. The whiskey is then cut to bottling strength (84 Proof) and bottled in Denver, Colorado.

Tincup has a dark caramel hue and an aroma with notes of citrus, black pepper and ginger snap. To taste, the whiskey has a strong flavour with rye spice, cinnamon and caramel, and a short, clean finish.”

Despite its Colorado stylings, Tincup is distilled in Indiana then shipped to Denver to receive its ‘Rocky Mountain spring water’ cut, and be bottled.

And the bottle is a thing of beauty, with very thick glass and a hexagonal shape (apparently this design was used back in the day to stop precious bottles rolling down the mountainside), it looks every inch the Old West part… You will probably choose to store snake oil in it, when the whiskey has been drunk. It also comes with a metal bottle cap which can be used as a shot glass, or rather, shot tin cup.

If you’d like to try before you buy, Tincup can be found on the back bars of Happiness Forgets (London), Cane & Grain (Manchester) and Lucky Liquor (Edinburgh). To buy some, speak to your Proximo rep.

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Editor

Andy Ives has over 10 years hospitality publishing to his name and has written for trade magazines such as CLASS and Theme. Most recently he worked as editor of Industry magazine (the Australian version of Theme), bars editor of Australian Bartender magazine, and launched (with Simon) www.4bars.com.au, which is now Australia’s leading bar industry website.

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